Race report: 2016 Shaughnessy 8k

My short-distance racing season continued this past Sunday at the Shaughnessy 8k. It was the first time I ran this race, organized by the Lions Gate Road Runners. For me, it was a chance to stay in training mode, as well as to experience a new race setting.

It was also my first race in my latest runemployment chapter, which gave me a little bit more freedom with when I run and even with whom I run. As a result, I’ve had a few quality workouts in the lead-up to this race.

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Stretching it out! (Photo credit: Debra Kato)

As I was warming up at the adjacent track, I got my photo taken, mid-stretch, by Debra Kato, who is an incredible supporter of the local running scene; you’ve likely seen her in a costume, taking photos of everyone. (Here’s another photo Debra took of me, after the West Van Run 5k.)

The race itself is a double loop of Vancouver’s Shaughnessy neighbourhood, full of winding streets and, as I discovered, undulating hills. I also discovered that it is a small race, with 222 total finishers this year. It allowed the field to spread out rather quickly; the initial uphill also helped with that. When I looked at the map, I knew there was a hill on 37th Avenue, which I’ve run in the past (uphill in the first kilometre, downhill in the last kilometre), but I didn’t think the rest of it (the 3 km loop section) had hills as well. This is where a preview of the race course would have been helpful.

When I looked at the timed kilometre splits for the race, I somehow held my own on those hills, as most of the splits were within 10 seconds of each other (4:55-5:05/km). I finished in a respectable 40:10.

Going in, I had a few goals for the race: finish under 42 minutes; finish top half or top 100 overall; finish top 10 in my division; and don’t get lapped in the second loop. That last one I thought of as I started the run. I can proudly say I succeeded in all those goals:

40:10
76/222 overall (top half and top 100)
57/119 males
7/10 males 35-39 (only 10 in the group, but it’s still top 10!)

And since I didn’t see the lead pack (or the pace car) until the end, I assume I wasn’t lapped.

I’d definitely do this run again; it’s a good springtime race in one of Vancouver’s nicest neighbourhoods.


Happy 100th birthday, Beverly Cleary!

Today (April 12) is the 100th birthday of a living literary legend. Beverly Cleary has inspired generations of children through her books, most notably those featuring Henry Huggins and Ramona Quimby.

I count myself as one of Mrs Cleary’s fans. I grew up reading her books; they were among the first I’ve read multiple times. Even now, some of the stories are still vivid in my mind, such as the scene where Ramona, enamored by a girl’s curly hair, reached out and pulled a lock of her hair, getting Ramona into trouble. The name “NOSMO KING” should also be familiar to religious readers of Ramona.

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Ramona Quimby statue at Grant Park, Portland

When I visited Portland, Oregon, for the first time in 2007, I made a point to visit the area where the Ramona and Henry books were set (which includes Klickitat Street). In nearby Grant Park, there is a statue garden featuring Ramona, Henry, and his dog Ribsy, immortalizing characters much loved not just in Portland, but around the world.

To mark Mrs Cleary’s milestone birthday, Oregon Public Broadcasting commissioned a short documentary, Discovering Beverly Cleary, that includes insights from the author herself.

Happy birthday, Beverly Cleary!


Race report: 2014 New York City Marathon

Selfie with a subway advert for the 2014 New York City Marathon

Get Your Together On

It was not my fastest marathon I’ve run, but of the three I have now completed, I must say that this was the most satisfying in that I had a strong finish.

But let’s start at the beginning, in 2012, when I was originally scheduled to run this race. Of course that didn’t happen, and I chose to come back and run it this year. Throughout this training cycle, including two 10k races, I’ve felt I could have a chance to break my personal-best time, but I also wanted to have fun in this race and soak in the atmosphere, the joy, of running through New York. In my mind, they’re not mutually exclusive, but I’d go for the latter if the former becomes out of reach.

I tried not to stress myself out between landing in New York and the race, although getting into the expo to pick up my bib was a bit of an ordeal (the queue wrapped around several times on the streets surrounding the convention centre).

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Race report: Cunningham Seawall 10k (Rock ‘n’ Roll Vancouver)

With a week to go, this race is the final tune-up before the NYC Marathon. For my training, it combined the last long-distance run before the marathon with a pace that is effectively tempo.

The Cunningham race has been running for more than four decades, but has now been incorporated with the inaugural half marathon for the Rock ‘n’ Roll series in Vancouver. Since I normally run most of my fall races in early October, I’d have shut down my racing season by the time this race comes around. With the NYC Marathon in early November instead, this gave me the opportunity to join in the tradition.

Since I last raced at the Eastside 10k, my marathon training has peaked with the longest runs of the cycle, at 18 and 21 miles. Despite the usual pre-run anxiety, I managed to survive those runs, and with some bursts of speed mixed in for good measure.

Back to the race at hand: it was a little chilly, which is typical for Vancouver in late October. There had been a storm the night before, but it went away in time for the race. I was aiming to run this around 55 minutes (not a PB, but hard enough to put in some effort), and so I was placed in a top corral.

The race starts on a downhill before leveling out on the Stanley Park seawall. There was the usual first-kilometre frenzy, where I went out a little too fast, but I settled on a rhythm after about the 2nd kilometre. For most of the run, I was trailing a couple, one of whom was wearing a devil’s-horns headband. They seemed to be going at my intended pace, so I just stayed with them. My pacing was good: around 5:25-5:30/km (~8:45/mi) for most of the intermediate kilometres. I made my surge in the last 800 metres or so, passing devil’s-horns guy, and finishing in 54:05.

The distance, both extrapolated from my watch and measured separately on a map, suggested it was more than 10 km. I’ve only questioned the measured distance of a race once before. It’s not that big a deal (most middle-of-the-pack racers ultimately run slightly more than the advertised distance due to weaving and not running on the tangents).

After the race, I found John, with whom I run at the weekly East Van Run Crew meetups. He told me he ran a PB on the race, so congratulations to him! (Here’s an instagram picture of the two of us with our medals.) I then made my way to the beer garden for my complimentary beverage. It was just after 9:00am, but I didn’t care, as it was a great reward for a job well done.

I quite enjoyed this race, and wish I started running this sooner. And with the half marathon also part of the race day, it does give me a local option for a fall half in the future.

Result:
54:05
369/2808 overall
219/752 males
37/112 males 30-34


Training update: dispatches from the long run

Yesterday, I completed the last long run of my training for the NYC Marathon. I brought my phone in an armband (that I bought a week ago) to test how well it travels with me.

The first hour was just pouring rain; I don’t how well I’d fare for four hours of it. But it mostly stopped by the time I entered Pacific Spirit Park. The first picture was on the trail after mile 7;  the second is not even 15 minutes later. It made the rest of the run much more pleasant!

Imperial Trail in Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Imperial Trail, around mile 7

Salish Trail in Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Salish Trail, between miles 8 and 9.

Selfie on Salish Trail, Pacific Spirit Regional Park

Selfie on Salish Trail

Maybe it was all the breaks I was taking for photos, or to consume gels & water, but I survived the almost four-hour run, completing 21 miles (33.9 km). My pacing was consistent, and even on the five separate miles I sped up, my legs were up to the challenge. I just have to be just as consistent with pacing and fueling, and I think I’ll do well for the big race. I just have to endure three weeks of agonizing taper!

Kitsilano Beach, Vancouver, taken 11 October 2014

Kitsilano Beach, about mile 14.5


Race review: 2014 Vancouver Eastside 10k

Selfie before running 2014 Vancouver Eastside 10k

On the way to the start line

When I first ran this race last year, I immediately fell in love with it. The Eastside 10k has that something that makes it a go-to race to run each year. It could be the route, or the small number of participants, or the late-summer weather. This race has all three.

First, I’ll bring you up to speed on my current training progress. The Eastside 10k marks the halfway point of my training for the New York City Marathon. The week before the race, I finished a 16-mile long run in which I felt comfortable throughout, and didn’t feel too many aches at the end. I’m crossing my fingers that the really long runs (18- and 20-milers still to come) will go just as well.

Also this summer, I started running with the East Van Run Crew (EVRC), a very social group with a weekly run that starts and finishes in front of Parallel 49 Brewing. I couldn’t resist the run + beer combination! The organizer printed up a few shirts, and I wore one of them during the Eastside 10k.

I got up the morning of the race not feeling very well. I barely had my usual pre-race breakfast, and felt nauseated. (Looking back, I think the case can be made for carb overloading the day before.) Nevertheless, I got dressed and made my way to the start area. I wasn’t aiming for a personal best on this race, but I still want to get in a decent time of under 55 minutes. At bag check, I found Sarah, who also runs with EVRC and was also wearing one the crew’s shirts. (She posted a picture of both of us, with our shirts, on her instagram.)

Once I got to the start line, the nausea has mostly gone away, but I still wanted to be cautious. At the last moment, I also made the decision not to look at my watch once I start the timer. I figured that if I wasn’t chasing a PB, I could just run by feel and not worry about time. It was quite liberating, actually. Not once was I even tempted to glance at my watch to check on my progress. The only point when I had an inkling of my time was at the finish, which showed the gun time. My chip time ended up being 56:39, which is off my sub-55 goal, but considering what I had gone through, I’d say that was a decent finish.

I was greeted at the finish line by Alan Brookes, race director for the Canada Racing Series, which organizes the Eastside 10k. He must have seen my shirt, as he stopped me after I received my medal and took a picture of me. I don’t recall saying what he quoted (I did just race 10 km), but I’ll claim it:

NYCM training is now in the 2nd half, and the excitement is building. Let’s get it done!

Result:
56:39 (5:39/km, 9:07/mi)
749/1462 overall
478/694 males
82/109 males 30-34


Rapid review – Doctor Who: “Deep Breath”

Promotional image of the 12th Doctor and Clara

I considered just tweeting out my thoughts on the first episode of Doctor Who series 8, “Deep Breath”, but it became clear I needed more than 140 characters. Spoilery stuff below, so click on if you dare…

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